Casefile Clues

30 March 2007

1910 Census Images--Rich and Famous

Our Rich and Famous in the 1910 census pages, include links to images of these well known people in the 1910 census. Suggestions for additions can be sent to me at mjnrootdig@gmail.com

Ansel Adams
Jane Addams
Eddie Albert
Sherwood Anderson
Philip Armour
Fred Astaire
Count Basie
Clyde Barrow of Bonnie and Clyde
Alexander Graham Bell
Jack Benny
Milton Berle
Irving Berlin
Edwin Binney
Humphrey Bogart
Lizzie Borden
George Burns
Busch Beer Family Hugh Brannum
William Jennings Bryan
Jimmy Cagney
Al Capone
Rachel Carson
Willa Cather
Frank Capra
Anton Cermak
George M. Cohan (one)
George M. Cohan (two)
Adolph Coors
Actress Joan Crawford
Bing Crosby
e e cummings
Richard Daley
Bette Davis
Francis Dee
John Dillinger
Walt Disney
Horace Dodge
John Dodge
Amelia Earhart
Wyatt Earp
George Eastman
Thomas Edison
Duke Ellington
Dwight Eisenhower
Douglas Fairbanks
William Faulkner
Harvey Firestone
Henry Ford
Baseball Great Lou Gehrig
Children's Author Theodore Geisel (Dr. Seuss)
Ira and George Gershwin
Author O. Henry
Katharine Hepburn
Oliver Wendell Holmes
J. Edgar Hoover
Howard Hughes
Langston Hughes
Lyndon Johnson
Scott Joplin
Helen Keller
Gene Krupa
William Lemp
Charles Lindbergh
Jack London
Jack London
Huey Long
Oscar Mayer
Joe McCarthy
Barbara McClintock
Elijah McCoy
H. L. Mencken
Ethel Merman
James Michener
Edward R. Murrow
Ogden Nash
Georgia O'Keefe
Louella Parsons
Norman Vincent Peale
J. C. Penney
Cole Porter
Katherine Anne Porter
C W Post
Marjorie Merriweather Post
Charles Ringling
Tex Ritter
John D. Rockefeller
Sigmund Romberg
Franklin Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
Babe Ruth
Carl Sandburg
Randolph Scott
Richard Sears
John Shedd
John Phillip Sousa
John Steinbeck
Jimmie Stewart
then President William Taft
Spencer Tracy
President Harry Truman
Mark Twain
Montgomery Ward
Booker T. Washington
Charles Walgreen
Montgomery Ward
John Wayne
Mae West
George Westinghouse
Laura Ingalls Wilder
Woodrow Wilson
Grant Wood
Wright Brothers
Frank Lloyd Wright
N C Wyeth
Cy Young
Florenz Ziegfeld

1900 Census Images of Rich and Famous

Here is a listing of all the rich and famous census images on our site from 1900. Suggestions for additions can be sent to me at mjnrootdig@gmail.com

Jane Addams

Sherwood Anderson
Susan B. Anthony
Phillip Armour
Amelia Earhart
Fred Astaire
Jack Benny
Humphrey Bogart
William Jennings Bryan
Joseph Bulova
George Burns
August Busch
James (Jimmy) Cagney
Al Capone
Willa Cather
Anton Cermak
Lon Chaney
Samuel Clemens--Mark Twain
Grover Cleveland
Walter Chrysler
Ty Cobb
Buffalo Bill Cody
Adolph Coors
Hart Crane
Clarence Darrow
Jack Dempsey
Melville Dewey
Horace Dodge
George Eastman
Mary Baker Eddy
Duke Ellington
Wyatt Earp
Thomas Edison
Dwight Eisenhower
T. S. Eliot
William Faulkner
Marshall Field
Harvey Firestone
Henry Ford
J. Paul Getty
Josiah Gibbs
Oscar Hammerstein
Benjamin Harrison

Ernest Hemingway
Henry Heinz
O. Henry
Oliver Wendell Holmes

Herbert Hoover

J. Edgar Hoover

Sarah Orne Jewett

Scott Joplin
Helen Keller
Jerome Kern
William Lemp
Jack London
Huey P. Long

the Marx Brothers
Oscar Mayer
Elijah McCoy
William McKinley
H. L. Mencken
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Georgia O'Keefe
Louella Parsons
Potter Palmer
George Patton
Norman Vincent Peale
J. C. Penney
Cole Porter
Katherine Anne Porter -- with her father
Katherine Anne Porter-- with her grandmother
C W Post
William Rand
Charles Ringling
Robert Ripley
the Rockefellers
Knute Rockne
Norman Rockwell
Theodore Roosevelt
Babe Ruth
Carl Sandburg
Randolph Scott
Richard Sears
Gustavus Swift
Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Billy Sunday
James Thurber
Jim Thorpe
Spencer TracyHarry Truman
Mark Twain
Honus Wagner
Charles Walgreen
Montgomery Ward
Booker T. Washington

Mae West
George Westinghouse
E. B. White
Laura Ingalls Wilder
Woodrow Wilson
Grant Wood
Wright Brothers
Frank Lloyd Wright
N. C. Wyeth
Cy Young

Jimmy Stewart in 1930


Actor Jimmy Stewart was living in Indiana, Pennsylvania in 1930 with his family as partially shown in the image included in this post. The 21 year old is listed without an occupation and his father runs a hardware store.
You can search of the 1930 census at Ancestry.com and see what your relatives are up to--hopefully they aren't living in a town that is also the name of a state (Illinois has a town named Oregon and one named Ohio) .If you don't have a subscription to Ancestry.com, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

Malcolm X in the 1930 Census

He might have been easier to find had his last name in 1930 been "X" instead of the much more common Little. Black activist Malcolm X and his family are living in Lansing, Michigan in 1930 as the partial image on the right show.
You can search of the 1930 census at Ancestry.com and see what names your relatives as listed with--however, it usually helps your search if you know the last name before you find them. If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

President Harry Truman Lives with in-laws


The 1920 United States Federal Census can be searched for your relative at Ancestry.com, regardless of whom they were living with. Those who don't have a subscription can read our free-trial suggestions here.

1920 Census--Perry Como

I didn't think Perry Como's real name was "Perry Como," but sure enough, it was. He and his family were living in Washington County, Pennsylvania in 1920 as shown in the image to the right. The complete image indicates the family immigrated in 1910 and that Como's older siblings were born in Italy.

The 1920 United States Federal Census can be searched for your relative at Ancestry.com. Those who don't have a subscription can read our free-trial suggestions here.

Bureau County Presentation--Links

I enjoyed presenting for the group in Bureau County last night (29 March) in Princeton, Illinois. Based upon conversations I had with a few attendees, I have posted the following links here as they were asked about and I either could not remember them or was not certain.

WW2 Enlistment search at the National Archives
http://aad.archives.gov/aad/series-description.jsp?s=3360&bc=sd

Genealogy in the United Kingdom and Ireland
http://www.genuki.org.uk/

Cyndislist--Migrations
http://www.cyndislist.com/migration.htm

Erie Canal
http://www.history.rochester.edu/canal/
http://www.eriecanal.org/

28 March 2007

Canadian Border Crossings Added to Ancestry.com

Border Crossing Records Added to Ancestry.com---for those who may be interested.

Ancestry.com announced the addition of more than 4 million names of individuals who crossed the U.S.-Canadian border between 1895 and 1956. These historical records are the latest addition to Ancestry.com’s Immigration Records Collection, which also includes more than 100 million names from the largest online collection of U.S. passenger lists, spanning 1820 to 1960.

Of course, there are no border crossing records for the time period I need them....1850s-1860s. I would love to know when William Ira Sargent crossed and when the family of Samuel Neill left New Brunswick. Oh well, some things will always remain mysteries.

Migration Chains

I've been thinking quite a bit about migration chains lately, largely because I'm giving three lectures about it in less than a month. And also because I realized that another of my families was part of a larger migration chain I was unaware of until recently.

Genealogists sometimes make the incorrect assumption that chains of migration only apply to non-English speaking immigrants. Nothing could be further from the truth. Of course, all of my German immigrants from 1860-1888 were parts of migration chains and this has been relatively easy to document. My wife has immigrants from Belgium, Sweden, Switzerland, Germany, and Quebec from the same time period and every one was part of a larger migration chain which we were eventually able to document. Even my Irish Neills were part of a larger group that I only recently discovered.

But "natives" also moved in chains---and they can be discovered if one takes the time. My Newmans from Kentucky into Indiana, Illinois, and eventually Iowa were part of a group that moved over a fifty some year time period. Other families moved from Amherst County, Virginia to Bourbon County, Kentucky over a twenty year time period in the very early eighteenth century.

Take the time to look for your ancestor's chain of migration.

Finding Peter, Paul, and Margarete

This article focuses on a group of immigrants to Davenport, Iowa in the 1850s. My search initially focused on Paul Freund, the direct ancestor. The article discusses how in this case, locating immigrant origins was possible only by COMPLETELY researching the immigrant in his new location first. This plan gave me adequate information in order to locate the desired family members in passenger lists. The problem with looking for just Paul Freund is that there were several Paul Freunds from Bavaria who came to the United States.

Those who want to read more about my search for Peter, Paul, and Margarete can do so here. And anyone who is related is more than welcome to send me an email at mjnrootdig@gmail.com.

Henry Thoreau in 1860


I learned a little something in locating Henry Thoreau in the 1860 census--his occupation was not what I expected. Admittedly, I knew little about Thoreau before I searched for him in 1860. We've posted the entire image which shows him living with other family members in Concord, New Hampshire.
Search the 1860 Census at Ancestry.com for your relative---whose occupation in 1860 may or may not be a surptise to you. If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

Gender Changing in 1860


Search the 1860 Census at Ancestry.com for your relative---who may have had his gender accidentally changed by a census taker--it's a little early for more permanent kinds of gender changes. If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

From Poor Leather Merchant to General


Search the 1860 Census at Ancestry.com for your relative---whose occupation in 1860 may or may not be a surptise to you. If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

1850 Census Harriet Beecher Stowe


Those with an Ancestry.com subscription can search the 1850 Census--everyname index for their own relatives--who probably were not writing books that started wars (which is what President Abraham Lincoln remarked to Stowe about her book). Those who don't have a subscription can read our free-trial suggestions here.

Frederick Douglass in the 1850 census


1850 finds Frederick Douglass living as a 33 year old editor in Rochester, New York, with his family. We've posted the complete image on our site.
Those with an Ancestry.com subscription can search the 1850 Census--everyname index for their own relatives--who may or may not have been editing things. Those who don't have a subscription can read our free-trial suggestions here.

Making Colors in 1910

There were probably very few in the 1910 census who listed their occupation as manufacturers of "colors, etc," but Edwin Binney did. He was the founder of Crayola Crayons. I just wonder what the "etc" stood for.
You can search the 1910 United States Federal Census for your own relatives at Ancestry.com regardless of what color was involved with their employment. If you don't have a subscription to Ancestry.com, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

Count Basie in the 1910 Census


You can search the 1910 United States Federal Census for your own relatives at Ancestry.com. If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

27 March 2007

1880 Female Head of Household

It is unusual to find a female listed as the head of the household, especially when her able-bodied husband is living with her and enumerated as well. The initial article I wrote on this subject generated a great deal of response and the follow up dealt with most issues presented by readers.

My ancestor in 1880 is a head of household and her husband is listed as the last member in the household (on the next page, no less). It is a somewhat unusual situation.

Part of the entry for the family of Anna Fecht in Prairie Township, Hancock County, Illinois' 1880 census follows.

Anna Fecht, aged 65, [head], married
John Habben, aged 20, son, single
George Habben, aged 18, son, single
Anna Habben, aged 13, daughter, single
Mattie Halts, aged 10, granddaughter, single
George Fecht, aged 12, stepson, single
Henry Fecht, aged 65, no relationship stated, married


Part I of the article can be viewed here and part II has been posted on our site as well.

Selective Service Classifications

My Grandfather Neill's WW2 Selective Service Classification Record indicates he was classified as a IIB, a IIIA, and a IVA. Selective Service sent me a list of classifications, but I also found them online.

The IIB meant deferred in war production.
The IIIA meant deferred for dependency reasons (my grandmother and their two children).
The IVA meant deferred by reason of age.

Nothing shocking, but interesting nonetheless.

Cyndi Starts Blogging

Cyndi Howells of Cyndislist has started her own blog. It is more commentary on internet usage and expectations...so don't start thinking she's going to post links there. It looks like she may even rant about things upon occasion. I've heard her rant in person before---we're in for a treat!

Striiiiiike 1--Abner Doubleday in 1850


Abner Doubleday's 1850 census entry is one of those where you've got to read the entries above it for just about everything except his name and age. Ditto marks come in real handy when everyone has the same job and was born in the same place. Hint: his occupation in 1850 had nothing to do with baseball.
Those with an Ancestry.com subscription can search the 1850 Census--everyname index for their own relatives--who may or may not have been striking out.
Those who don't have a subscription can read our free-trial suggestions here.

1930 Census--Shirley Temple


It is difficult to read, but the last name in this image is Shirley Temple--child star. Imagine trying to find that if you did not already have a good idea of where she was living. The rest of the entry indicates where the family was living in California and the father's occupation.
You can search of the 1930 census at Ancestry.com and see what your relatives are up to.
If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

1930 President


Not many individuals have their "industry" in the 1930 census listed as "United States" and even fewer list their occupation as president. The entire image can be seen here for those who are not aware of who was president in 1930.
You can search of the 1930 census at Ancestry.com and see what your relatives occupations are---doubtful if they are president. If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

Peter Graves and James Arness in 1930 Census


Peter Graves and James Arness are enumerated with the last name Aurness in the 1930 census in Minnesota. The brothers were small children at the time of this enumeration and their father worked as a salesman.
You can search of the 1930 census at Ancestry.com and see what your relatives are up to.
If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

26 March 2007

Friends on the Farm


My great-aunt has written a small book, Friends on the Farm, about growing up in rural west-central Illinois (Hancock County) in the 1930s and 1940s. I haven't read it yet (my Mom is waiting til Aunt Ruth visits to have her sign our copies); however I did read snippets of it that last time I was down to visit my parents. I have learned that my mother was a "neat litle kid" and that my great-grandfather, much to the chagrin of his fellow German neighbors voted for Roosevelt during the Depression (I bet THAT went over really well...). We'll post more about the book later after I've had a chance to read it.

A A Milne in the Census


He didn't have a Pooh Bear of his own, but 9 year old A A Milne is shown here in this census enumeration with his parents. The complete image can be seen here.

J. R. R. Tolkien alive in 1901


Didn't know people living in 1901 could still have new books published in 2007, did you? J. R. R. Tolkien has a new book coming out according to several sources and yet he was already a small child in 1901 when he was enumerated with his widowed mother in the United Kingdom census. Fans of the book may be glad this unfinshed book is finally being published. I'm not a big fan, so I can't speak to that. I can only help wondering...if Tolkien had been a Chicago resident would he still be voting?

Virginia Beach Seminar--this weekend 31 March 2007

I'll be presenting 4 lectures at the annual Virginia Beach Genealogical Society Seminar this weekend on March 31 at the Virginia Beach Public Library.

The day's schedule:

8:30 - 8:55 Registration
9:00 - 9:15 Welcome/announcements and introduction of speaker
9:15 - 10:15 "Online Genealogy Research: what to do, how to do it and how to keep organized"
10:15 - 10:55 Break/Door Prizes/Lobby Time
11:00 - 12:00 "Online Genealogy Research" continued
12:00 - 1:10 Lunch Break - Lunch provided for pre-registrants. (see form)
1:15 - 1:30 Welcome Back/ Door Prizes
1:30 - 2:30 "Effective Internet Searching - Get the most out of that website"
2:30 - 2:55 Break/Door Prizes
3:00 - 4:00 "Beginning Your German Research"
4:15 - 4:30 Closing

More information is on the Society's website.
If anyone is wanting to attend at the "last minute" the society's website has contact information for society officers.

Courthouse Suggestions

The county courthouse is one of my favorite places to research--remember that many of these records are not available online or on microfilm. A few years ago, we posted an article about visiting the courthouse--suggestions that are still valid today.

Courthouse Lessons Learned

Where Did the $$ Go?

Tracking your ancestor's money after his or her death can provide signficant genealogical clues. There are many sources of this information, not just limited to the will. An older article on our site discusses ways to locate this information and provides some clues for interpreting this information.

Where Did the Money Go?

Google Ads At Ancestry

Am I bothered by the Google ads at Ancestry.com? Not really.
I pay to watch a movie in a theatre, but there are ads before the movie. And in some movies if I watch closely, the people all drink one brand of pop. Any vending machines that happen to be shown in the background are for that same brand. That's not an accident either.
Frankly, the ads are just about like my "gmail" page where I pretty much ignore those as well.

Photographer Ansel Adams in 1910


I doubt if took any pictures when Albert DeGuerre came knocking to take the census, but he certainly was enumerated in 1910. Photographer Ansel Adams was only 8 in 1910 and is enumerated with his parents in San Francisco, California in 1910. His father, Charles Adams, is listed as being in the lumber business.
You can search the 1910 United States Federal Census for your own relatives at Ancestry.com. If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

Women's Rights Advocate Elizabeth Cady Stanton-1870



Elizabeth Cady Stanton, one of the leaders of the women's rights movement is listed as "keeping house" in 1870 as shown in the image in this post.

The family was living in Hackensack, New Jersey and their household included four servants.

You can search for your relative in the 1870 census, but chances are if your female relative was "keeping house" she didn't have four servants to help. Those who don't have a subscription can read our free-trial suggestions here.

1930 Census--June Carter Cash


It is one of our most popular "famous census" pages--June Carter Cash in 1930.
Her real name was not June; she is shown here as Valiria...for Valarie. The census also listed an occupation for her mother, along with the name of an employer--not many women in rural Virginia listed themselves as musicians.
You can search of the 1930 census at Ancestry.com and see what your ancestor listed as her occupation--if one is even listed. Those who don't have a subscription can read our free-trial suggestions here.

23 March 2007

Remembering my flashdrive

I am as forgetful as anything.
I love my flash drive that I got for Christmas...it makes taking a great deal of files with me extremely easy--genealogy files, presentations, etc.
The problem is that I am ALWAYS afraid I'm going to leave it somewhere, especially plugged into some laptop in a cybercafe like I'm in right now in Nashville. To reduce the chance of leaving it, I have the strap around my wrist as it is plugged in and as I'm typing. The strap is a constant reminder.
Now just to find a "trick" to not leave it in a machine when I'm making a presentation where I'm not "at" the machine constantly...

22 March 2007

Check your assumptions


My previous post indicated that my great-great-grandfather's death certificate indicated and his parents were born in Saxony. I wrote this from memory. BIG MISTAKE.

Turns out the death record was not even that specific---Germany was listed as the birthplace of John and his parents.
Be careful relying on memory and always check your assumptions. Don't add to the confusion already existing in some records.

The Importance of Siblings


Beginning genealogists may be tempted to focus only on their own direct line, ignoring records from siblings of their ancestors. This can lead to missed information. The death certificate of my great-great-grandfather, John Michael Trautvetter indicates he and his parents were born in Saxony. That is very specific and very helpful (grin). The clip on the right is from his brother George's death certificate. George's record provides exact places of birth for George and his parents.
Of course this is secondary information, but it still is a valuable clue and would have been overlooked if I had only focused on "my line."

At least we didn't get any bones


To view the death date for Lucinda Kile in the Greenmound Cemetery in Keithsburg, Mercer County, Illinois, we had to do a little digging. Fortunately the stone is in excellent shape and teh inscription is very legible.
There are a number of tombstone pictures and "how-to" articles on our site for taking pictures, making rubbings, etc. Plan before you go, don't leave a mess, and treat the cemetery and stones with respect.

Is the Original Wrong?


The accuracy of the original should never be assumed--regardless of when the record was created and who gave the information. And sometimes errors are just that--errors.


If you search the online index of World War I Draft cards at Ancestry.com for only the year 1918, you will get many hits. If the actual card image is viewed, it will be seen that the card does actually say 1918 as the year of birth. Think about it for a second, have you ever written the wrong year on a check or an application? It is very easy to do. Those who transcribed the data for the online index of World War I Draft cards at Ancestry.com were supposed to transcribe what the card said, not what they thought it should say. Of course, the transcribers were human so they may have made mistakes, but the mistake could just as easily have been on the original.

A few samples of these cards can be viewed on our site.
And if you want to play with the database and don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.


Naming Patterns...

Have you thought about where your ancestor got the first names of all their children? While some families break the rules just to confuse us, many obtained names of their children from other relatives. Keep in mind the potential that a child was named for a parent, grandparent, or ancestral sibling. Our article Named for Whom? discusses naming patterns and issues one must be aware of when using these tendencies in research. Naming patterns are clues, clues, clues, not fact, fact, fact.

1910 Census--C. W. Post


I don't eat Toasties anymore, and I certainly don't want any from 1910, but the image to the right shows the occupation listed for C. W. Post (founder of Post cereals) in 1910. The rest of the enumeration includes the rest of the family and the requisite household staff that any large food manufacturer is bound to have.
You can search the 1910 United States Federal Census for your own relatives at Ancestry.com. If you don't have a subscription, you can read our suggestions for a 14 day free trial here.

1850 Census--Nathaniel Hawthorne


He's living in Stockbridge, Mass, with his family.
Those with an Ancestry.com subscription can search the 1850 Census--everyname index.
Those who don't have a subscription can read our free-trial suggestions here.

1930 Census--no name Jackie O


Jackie Bouvier Kennedy Onassis is enumerated in the 1930 census--well sort of. Her father is listed in in NYC's Manhattan as shown here, but his wife and young daughter are listed without names. Based upon the complete enumeration and known information about the Bouvier family, it's pretty certain this is the right family.

The reason for the unusual entry is anyone's guess, but if it can happen to a future first lady, it could happen to your less well-known ancestors as well. If you can't find someone when searching a census index, make certain you have searched for every family member.

You can search of the 1930 census at Ancestry.com and see if your ancestors show up no names---maybe they were in the witness protection program!

Believe it or Not--Robert Ripley in 1900


We've posted the 1900 census image for Robert Ripley (of "Ripley's Believe it or not" fame) to our site. His name, believe it or not, was not actually Robert, but was actually Leroy.


Believe it or not, the 1900 Census can be searched at Ancestry.com.

1910 Census--Oscar Mayer

http://www.rootdig.com/1910census/1910_oscar_mayer.html
I had to think of the television jingle to get Oscar Mayer's name spelled correctly--I guess I'm showing my age by even admitting that I remember those commercials ("I wish I were an....")

Oscar Mayer and family are listed as meatpackers in the 1910 census in Chicago.

21 March 2007

Where Did I Get That?

Ever find a copy of something and wonder where you got it from? It can happen to anyone. And even if we know now to track all our sources, most of us researched for at least a while before we came to appreciate the importance of tracking where our information originated (for how can we compare and evaluate if we have no idea of the original source?).Even if we keep track of everything we get, a relative can easily send us something and have no idea where they got it. An older article on our site discusses such situations and some ways for determining where a document really came from.

We called it Orphaned Papers.

Lizzie Borden in US Census Records

We've got Lizzie Borden in the US Census from 1870-1920 on our site for those who are interested in the notorious Borden daughter from Massachusetts. We don't have her in 1910 and anyone who can find her in that year is welcome to email me mjnrootdig@gmail.com and we'll add her image to this site.

Wyatt Earp 1850-1920

We've added census images for Illinois native Wyatt Earp to our site from 1850 through 1920. The gunfighter was born in Monmouth, Illinois, but there is some debate as to the precise spot. Since I wasn't around then, I'm not exactly certain where he was born and the specific coordinates of his birthplace are probably not THAT important. I know precisely where I was born, but that's not too important as I'm not famous ;-)

Copies of SS-5 Forms

They aren't cheap, but in some cases, copies of an SS-5 form may be just what your genealogy research needs. The form shown here is for my wife's grandmother. She listed a different father on this form than her children listed on her death certificate, obituary, and other records for which one of her children was an informant.

The SSDI at Rootsweb can be searched for free. It can also be searched on our page which has more information about the SS-5 form, including how to obtain it. I usually only obtain SS-5 forms when I have a big "brick wall" or records created after the person's death are insufficient.

20 March 2007

Tagging the Maytags in 1925

Maytag founder Frederick Maytag's 1925 Iowa State census entry makes two excellent points--the importance of looking for neighbors and the fact that some individuals can be listed by their initials.

My initial searches for Frederick Maytag brought no results with the correct age, but viewing the entry for Frederick Maytag (shown as a son in the neighboring household), I quickly saw the grandparents living next door.

Always consider someone being enumerated under their initials and always pay attention to the neighbors.

Those with an Ancestry.com account (either US or World) can access the Iowa State Censuses (and the images) at Ancestry.com as a part of their account. Those without an account can search the database as part of a free 14-day trial (read our free trial "suggestions" before signing up.)

Cleaning Clothes in 1920


The 1920 Census found the Maytags of Maytag washer fame, living in Newton, Iowa. Frederick Maytag isn't living there anymore---and Maytags are made there anymore either, if I recall. At least they didn't move Maytag's remains to Mexico!
You can clean up on your search for your relatives in the 1920 United States Federal Census. Just don't go too crazy during the spin cycle.

Anne Landers and Dear Abby



We've been giving (and getting) advice on the Iowa State Censuses at Ancestry.com . And it finally dawned on me that the queens of advice giving should be in the 1925 Iowa State Census--Anne Landers and Dear Abby--the Friedman sisters and twins, Esther and Pauline Friedman. And sure enough they were--living in Sioux City, Iowa with their sister and parents.


The census entry for their parents indicates they were born in Russia, but the index entry lists this as the Soviet Union---we're not going to get into that mess here. THe parents were married in Nebraska.


Those who want to find the Friedmans in the census and view the complete set of images (remember for the 1925 census there are three images---completing a set of six pages where the second two sets are overlaid onto the first to prevent the names from having to be rewritten)--can search the Iowa State Census Collection at Ancestry.com.

1927 Katharine Hepburn goes abroad



In 1927 Katharine Hepburn returned to the United States on the Leviathan, sailing from France. The 20 year old was apparently travelling without family as no other Hepburns were listed. One may easily find American citizens on passenger manifests, not just the rich and famous.

These indexes to these records and the digitized images can be obtained for your relative by searching Ancestry.com

Wig Maker, Wig Maker, Make me a Wig



His name is now associated with a company, but not one that makes wigs.
And if any makeup was spilled on his card, I didn't see it.
Max Factor indicates he is a wigmaker on his World War I Draft Card, as shown in the image included in this post. The founder of the cosmetics firm was a Russian native who was living in California at the time of the registration for the World War I Draft.
This card comes from the World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 database at Ancestry.com where you can search for your own relatives who might have registered---who knows what their occupation might have been?

Cole Porter-World War I Draft Card

Not everyone listed Carnegie Hall as their employer on their World War I Draft Card, but 25 year old Cole Porter did. The Indiana native is living in New York at the time of the registration.
This card comes from the World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 database at Ancestry.com where you can search for your own relatives who might have registered.

19 March 2007

Booker T. Washington--1880 Census


The 1880 census found Booker T. Washington working as a 24 year old school teacher in Virginia. His name was a little difficult to read, but this entry was consistent with known information about Washington.
You can search the 1880 Census at Ancestry.com to search for your relative---just be careful about how her name might be written.

Ft. Wayne Library Trip Update

We have fixed a few minor glitches on our website for the annual research trip to the Allen County Public Library co-sponsored by the St. Charles County, Genealogical Society and St. Charles Community College. The trip runs from 30 May- 3 June 2007. We still have plenty of room--and you can even drive or fly in from other locations besides suburban St. Louis.

For more information visit our updated and corrected website.

1900 Census--Jack Benny


The 1900 census finds comedian Jack Benny enumerated as Bennie Kubelsky, living with his parents in Waukegan, Lake County, Illinois.
The 1900 Census can be searched at Ancestry.com--hopefully your relative did not alter his name as much as Jack Benny did.

Searching the Iowa State Censuses at Ancestry.com

The Iowa State Census search interface at Ancestry.com gives the user many options. It is important to note that not all of these search options are applicable to all the census years in the database. Many of the advanced search options (particularly those related to parents ) are only available for the 1925 census. Earlier census (such as the 1856) may not even give the relationship to the head of household--in fact the households may not even be clearly distinguished on the census. Searchers are encouraged to browse censuses for years they are searching to become familiar with the schedules and the information they contain.

Of course, for 1925, take full advantage of all those questions that were asked. The images of the search interface follow. Those with an Ancestry.com account (either US or World) can access the Iowa State Censuses (and the images) at Ancestry.com as a part of their account. Those without an account can search the database as part of a free 14-day trial (read our free trial "suggestions" before signing up.)




Michael's suggestions if you get a free trial at Ancestry.com

Michael's suggestions to getting a free trial at Ancestry.com .

I have Ancestry.com at home and like it and get a lot of use out of it. I've been known to use it on my lunch hour at work. These suggestions are based upon our experiences and the experiences of other users. Following the directions at the link below will allow you to get a free 14-day trial at Ancestry.com. Before getting the trial, remember to:

1) Get the free trial when you will have time to actually use it.
2) Write or print out any toll-free numbers Ancestry.com gives you.
3) Write the day your 14 days expires.
4) Make a decision about cancelling your free trial BEFORE the 14th day. If you are going to cancel, do so on or before day 13.
5) Consider joining the Gen-Newbie list at Rootsweb if you are new to computers or genealogy--there are many on the list who can help if you have difficulty using Ancestry, the image viewer, or the indexes.
6) If day thirteen is on a weekend, call the Friday before.

Free Trial - Ancestry.com US Deluxe Membership can be had by clicking here.

1925 Iowa State Census

The images on the right are part of the 1925 Iowa state census entries for Ekke and Nanke Behrens, my aunt and uncle. The second image shows an additional part of their entry, whjich includes the names of their parents and where their parents were married.






The images have been reduced here to decrease load time, but one can easily zoom in the images. The larger image shown below is magnified at 100%.








The 1925 State Census for Iowa asks the following questions:

  • Surname.

  • Given Name.

  • Relation. Relationship within the family.

  • Sex.

  • Color. When not "White", this information is listed under the title "Various" on the census page view (not on surname search results).

  • Age.

  • Marital Status. S for Single, M for married, W for widowed, D for divorced.

  • Own or Rent. This field applies to the head of household.
  • Free or Mortgaged. For owned property, whether owned outright or mortgaged.
  • Home Value. Value of property.
  • Mortage Debt.

  • Rent Amount.

  • Insurance Amount.
  • Foreign Born Status.
  • Years Residing in the U.S.

  • Years Residing in Iowa.

  • Highest School Level. R=Rural, G=Grade, H=High School, C=College.

  • Highest Grade Level.

  • Number of Months Attending School. In past year.
  • Whether Can Read.

  • Whether Can Write.

  • Place of Birth.

  • Father's Surname.

  • Father's Given Name.

  • Father's Age.

  • Mother's Surname.

  • Mother's Given Name.

  • Mother's Age.

  • Parent's Place of Marriage.

  • War Experience. Whether Veteran/Branch or Service in Which Served/State Enlisted or Drafted From. For Civil War, Spanish American War, and World War I.
  • Occupation. Agricultural, Professional Services, Domentic and Personal Services, Trade and Transportation, Manufacturing and Mechanical, or Laborer.

  • Months Unemployed Due to Illness from Communicable Diseases.
  • Lost Income Due to Above.
  • Month's Unemployed in 1924.
  • Comments. When present, this information is listed under the title "Various" on the census page view (not on surname search results).


A wonderful source recently indexed by Ancestry.com. And a great way to spend a lot of time. Those who don't have an ancestry account can read our suggestions for getting a free trial before subscribing.

18 March 2007

1856 Iowa State Census


One of the recently added databases at Ancestry.com is the complete set of Iowa state censuses. The image in this post comes from the 1856 state census for Scott County, Iowa. This entry is actually for Peter Freund, but the name was spelled Frent. A soundex search easily caught the entry. An upcoming article in the Ancestry World Journal will discuss using these wonderful records for the Freund family. Meanwhile genealogists can be searching for their Iowa ancestors in this Ancestry.com database.